Learn web development as an absolute beginner (2020)

Are you trying to learn web development, but not sure where to start?

There are a ton of resources out there. But right now, all you need is the basics of web development– a general explanation with some direction on where to go next.

First, here are the steps you will follow in order to become a web developer.

Steps to learn web development basics:

  1. Basics: How websites work, front-end vs back-end, using a code editor
  2. Basics: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript
  3. Tools: Package managers, build tools, version control
  4. Additional front-end: Sass, responsive design, JavaScript frameworks
  5. Back-end basics: Servers and databases, programming language

I recommend doing Steps 1, 2, and 3 in order. Then, depending on whether you want to focus on more front-end or back-end, you can do steps 4a or 4b in any order.

I personally think it’s good idea for front-end web developers to know at least a bit of back-end, and vice versa. At the very least, learning the basics of both will help you figure out if you like front-end or back-end web development better 🙂

Roadmap to learn web development (infographic)

Here’s a helpful infographic showing you all the steps in the roadmap to learn web development as a beginner!

Infographic beginner's roadmap to web development
Click to load full-size image

Now, let’s jump right into the first step!

1: What is web development?

Before we get into actual coding, let’s first take a look at some general information on what web development is: how websites work, the difference between front and back-end, and using a code editor.

How do websites work?

All websites, at their most basic, are just a bunch of files that are stored on a computer called a server. This server is connected to the internet. You can then load that website through a browser (like Chrome, Firefox, or Safari) on your computer or your phone. Your browser is also called the client in this situation.

So, every time that you’re on the internet, you (the client) are getting and loading data (like cat pics) from the server, as well as submitting data back to the server (load moar cat pics!) This back and forth between the client and the server is the basis of the internet.

Anything that you can access in your browser is something that a web developer built. Some examples are small business websites and blogs on the simpler side, all the way up to very complex web apps like AirBnb, Facebook and Twitter.

What’s the difference between front-end and back-end?

The terms “front end,” “back end,” and “full stack” web developer describe what part of the client/server relationship you’re working with.

“Front end” means that you’re dealing mainly with the client side. It’s called the “front end” because it’s what you can see in the browser. Conversely, the “back end” is the part of the website that you can’t really see, but it handles a lot of the logic and functionality that is necessary for everything to work.

One way you can think about this is that front-end web development is like the “front of house” part of a restaurant. It’s the section where customers come to see and experience the restaurant– the interior decor, seating, and of course, eating the food.

On the other hand, back-end web development is like the “back of house” part of the restaurant. It’s where deliveries and inventory are managed, and the process to create the food all happens. There’s a lot of things behind the scenes that the customers won’t see, but they will experience (and hopefully enjoy) the end product– a delicious meal!

Fun illustrations aside, both front and back end web development serve different but very important functions.

Using a code editor

When you build a website, the most essential tool that you will use is your code editor or IDE (Integrated Development Environment). This tool allows you to write the markup and code that will make up the website.

There are quite a few good options out there, but currently the most popular code editor is VS Code. VS Code is a more lightweight version of Visual Studio, Microsoft’s main IDE. It’s fast, free, easy to use, and you can customize it with themes and extensions.

Other code editors are Sublime Text, Atom, and Vim.

If you’re just getting started, though, I’d recommend checking out VS Code, which you can download from their website.

Now that we’ve covered some of the broader concepts in what web development is, let’s get into more of the details– starting with the front end.

2: Basic front-end

The front-end of a website is made up of three types of files: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. These files are what is loaded in the browser, on the client side.

Let’s take a closer look at each one of them.

HTML

HTML, or HyperText Markup Language, is the foundation of all websites. It’s the main file type that is loaded in your browser when you look at a website. The HTML file contains all the content on the page, and it uses tags to denote different types of content.

For example, you can use tags to create headline titles, paragraphs, bulleted lists, images, and so on. HTML tags by themselves do have some styles attached, but they are pretty basic, like what you would see in a Word document.

CSS

CSS, or Cascading Style Sheets, lets you style that HTML content so it looks nice and fancy. You can add colors, custom fonts, and layout the elements of your website however you want them to look. You can even create animations and shapes with CSS!

There is a lot of depth to CSS, and sometimes people tend to gloss over it so they can move on to things like JavaScript. However, I can’t overestimate the importance of understanding how to convert a design into a website layout using CSS. If you want to specialize in front-end, it’s essential to have really solid CSS skills.

JavaScript

JavaScript is a programming language that was designed to run in the browser. Using JavaScript, you can make your website dynamic, meaning it will respond to different inputs from the user, or other sources.

For example, you can build a “Back to Top” button that when the user clicks it, they’ll scroll back up to the top of the page. Or you can build a weather widget that will display today’s weather based on the user’s location in the world.

Especially if you want to develop your skills later on with a JavaScript framework like React, you’ll understand more if you take the time to learn regular vanilla JavaScript first. It’s a really fun language to learn, and there’s so much you can do with it!

Where to learn HTML, CSS and JavaScript

When people ask me where to learn web development, I will usually recommend they check out one of the following resources.

Note: Some of the links below (the ones to paid courses and books) are affiliate links, which means I’ll get a commission if you buy through them at no additional cost to yourself. It’s one way you can support me in creating helpful resources like this one!

freecodecamp-logo

One of my favorite places to recommend is freeCodeCamp. It’s an online coding bootcamp that is non-profit and completely free! I love this option because if you’re a beginner and not completely sure if coding is for you, it’s a low pressure, risk-free way to see if you like it.

One downside to freeCodeCamp is that while they do have an incredible curriculum with a built-in coding environment, they don’t have structured videos as part of it.

So if you really like learning from videos, here are a few other options:

treehouse-logo

Team Treehouse is a premium online learning platform that is video based and has multiple tracks that you can follow. They even have an online Tech Degree program which is like an online bootcamp that you can complete in 4-5 months.

Unfortunately, Treehouse isn’t free, but they do have different monthly or yearly plans depending on your budget. They have a free 7-day trial so you can see if you like it, and I can also give you a deal where you can get $100 off of 1 year of their Basic Plan. If you’re fairly certain you want to get into web development, Team Treehouse is a great place to learn.

If you’re more of a fan of one-off video courses, there are some free and paid options:

wesbos-logo

Wes Bos has free courses on learning Flexbox, CSS Grid, and JavaScript that are excellent. I just went through his CSS Grid course, and it was really thorough and also fun. Wes is a great teacher!

udemy-logo

Udemy is an online learning platform with a lot of great courses as well. One in particular that you might like is The Advanced CSS and Sass course by Jonas Schmedtmann– this paid course covers CSS grid, flexbox, responsive design, and other CSS topics!

YouTube

There are also a ton of free video resources on YouTube:

Traversy Media, probably the biggest web development channel out there, has an HTML Crash Course and CSS Crash Course for beginners.

DesignCourse, a channel focused on web design and front-end, has an HTML & CSS tutorial for beginners as well.

And freeCodeCamp has their own YouTube channel, with videos like a Learn JavaScript for beginners course and other in-depth courses.

Books and articles on web development

If you’re more of a reading person, I would highly recommend the following:

jon-duckett-books

The incredibly popular Jon Duckett books, on HTML & CSS, and JavaScript & jQuery. These books are not your dense, run-of-the-mill textbooks at all. They are beautifully designed, really well-written, and have lots of photos and images to help teach the material.

eloquent-js-book

Eloquent JavaScript is another book that I really like. You can read it for free on their website, or buy a paper copy from Amazon if you like physical books. I have this one myself, and I really like it!

And last but not least, some websites that have great articles and other resources are:

3: Tools

Let’s get into some other front-end technologies now. As we mentioned, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript are the basic building blocks of front-end web development. In addition to them, there are a few other tools that you’ll want to learn.

Package managers

Package managers are online collections of software, much of it open source. Each piece of software, called a package, is available for you to install and use in your own projects.

You can think about them like plugins– instead of writing everything from scratch, you can use helpful utilities that other people have written already.

The most popular package manager is called npm, or Node Package Manager, but you can also use another manager called Yarn. Both are good options to know and use, although it’s probably best to start out with npm.

If you’re curious to learn more, you can read this article on the basics of using npm.

Build tools

Module bundlers and build tools like Webpack, Gulp, or Parcel, are another essential part of the front-end workflow.

On a basic level, these tools run tasks and process files. You can use them to compile your Sass files to CSS, transpile your ES6 JavaScript files down to ES5 for better browser support, run a local web server, and many other helpful tasks.

Gulp, technically a task runner, has a suite of npm packages that you can use to compile and process your files.

Webpack is a super powerful bundler that can do everything Gulp can do plus more. It’s used a ton in JavaScript environments, particularly with JavaScript Frameworks (which we’ll get to in a bit). One down side of Webpack is that it requires a lot of configuration to get up and running, which can be frustrating for beginners.

Parcel is a newer bundler like Webpack, but it comes pre-configured out of the box, so you can literally get it going in just a few minutes. And you won’t have to worry as much about configuring everything.

Personally I like using Gulp for my own front-end workflows where I just want to compile my Sass and JavaScript files and not do too much else.

Helpful links

If you’re interested in Gulp or Parcel, I have tutorials for both of those:

I also have a premium course on Gulp for Beginners, if you’re looking for a more in-depth tutorial on how to use Gulp to make your front-end workflow more efficient!

If you want to learn more about Webpack check out the following YouTube videos:

Version control

Version control (also called source control) is a system that keeps track of every code change that you make in your project files. You can even revert to a previous change if you make a mistake. It’s almost like having infinite save points for your project, and let me tell you, it can be a huge lifesaver.

The most popular version control system is an open source system called Git. Using Git, you can store all your files and their change history in collections called repositories.

You may have also heard of GitHub, which is an online hosting company owned by Microsoft where you can store all your Git repositories.

To learn Git and GitHub, GitHub.com has some online guides that explain how to get up and running. Traversy Media also has a YouTube video explaining how Git works.

4a: Additional front-end

Once you have the basics of front-end down, there are some more intermediate skills that you will want to learn. I recommend that you look at the following: Sass, responsive design, and a JavaScript framework.

Sass

Sass is an extension of CSS that makes writing styles more intuitive and modular. It’s a really powerful tool. With Sass, you can split up your styles into multiple files for better organization, create variables to store colors and fonts, and use mixins and placeholders to easily reuse styles.

Even if you just utilize some of the basic features, like nesting, you will be able to write your styles more quickly and with less headache.

You can learn more about Sass in this Scotch.io tutorial, as well as a YouTube video by Dev Ed.

Responsive design

Responsive design ensures that your styles will look good on all devices– desktops, tablets, and mobile phones. The core practices of responsive design include using flexible sizing for elements, as well as utilizing media queries to target styles for specific devices and widths.

For example, instead of setting your content to be a static 400px wide, you can use a media query and set the content to be 50% width on desktop and 100% on mobile.

Building your websites with responsive CSS is a must these days, as mobile traffic is outpacing desktop traffic in many cases.

For more information on responsive design and making your websites responsive, check out this article. I also do live coding streams on my YouTube channel where I build a responsive website from scratch.

JavaScript frameworks

Once you have the basics of vanilla JavaScript down, you may want to learn one of the JavaScript frameworks (especially if you want to be a full-stack JavaScript developer).

These frameworks come with pre-built structures and components that allow you to build apps more quickly than if you started from scratch.

Currently, you have three main choices: React, Angular, and Vue.

React (technically a library), was created by Facebook and is the most popular framework right now. You can get started learning by going to the React.js website. If you’re interested in a premium React course, both Tyler McGinnins and Wes Bos have great courses for beginners.

Angular was the first big framework, and it was created by Google. It’s still very popular, even though it has been surpassed by React recently. You can start learning Angular on their website. Gary from DesignCourse also has an Angular crash course on YouTube.

Vue is a newer framework created by Evan You, a former Angular developer. While it is smaller in use than React and Angular, it is growing quickly and is also considered easy and fun to use. You can get up and running with it on the Vue website.

Which framework should you learn?

You might be wondering now, “Ok, well, which framework is the best?”

The truth is, they are all good. In web development, there’s almost never a single choice that is 100% the best choice for every person and every situation.

Your choice will most likely be determined by your job, or simply by which one you enjoy using the most. If your end goal is to land a job, try researching which framework seems to be the most common in potential job listings.

Don’t worry too much about which framework to choose. It’s more important that you learn and understand the concepts behind them. Also, once you learn one framework it will be easier to learn other ones (similar to programming languages).

Let’s move on now to our last section: back-end web development!

4b: Basic back-end

The back-end, or server-side of web development, is made up of three main components: the server, a server-side programming language, and the database.

Server

As we mentioned at the very beginning, the server is the computer where all the website files, the database, and other components are stored.

Traditional servers run on operating systems such as Linux or Windows. They’re considered “centralized” because everything– the website files, back-end code, and data are stored together on the server.

Nowadays there are also serverless architectures, which is a more decentralized type of setup. This type of application splits up those components and leverages third party vendors to handle each of them.

Despite the name, though, you still do need some kind of server, to at least store your website files. Some examples of serverless providers are AWS (Amazon Web Services) or Netlify.

Serverless setups are popular because they are fast, cheap, and you don’t need to worry about server maintenance. They’re great for simple static websites that don’t require a traditional server-side language. However, for very complex applications the traditional server setup might be a better option.

To learn more about serverless setups, Netlify has an informative blog post that takes you through all the steps to setup a static website with deployment.

Programming language

On the server, you need to use a programming language to write the functions and logic for your application. The server then compiles your code and conveys the result back to the client.

Popular programming languages for the web include PHP, Python, Ruby, C# and Java. There is also a form of server-side JavaScript– Node.js, which is a run-time environment that can run JavaScript code on the server.

There are also frameworks that you can use with each of these server-side languages. Just like the front-end JavaScript frameworks, these back-end frameworks are helpful tools that make building web apps much quicker.

Let’s check out a list of the most commonly used programming languages for web development:

C#

C# was developed as Microsoft’s competitor to Java. It’s used to make web apps with the .NET framework, game development, and can even be used to create mobile apps.

Places to learn C#:
C# Programming Yellow Book by Rob Miles
C# Basics for Beginners on Udemy

Java

Java is one of the most popular programming languages, and is used in web apps as well as to build Android apps.

Places to learn Java:
University of Helsinki’s MOOC
The Complete Java Developer Course on Udemy

Node.js

Node.js is a very popular technology (according to Stack Overflow’s 2019 developer survey). One thing to note: it isn’t technically a server-side language– it’s a form of JavaScript that runs on the server using the Express.js framework.

Places to learn Node.js:
Node.js tutorial by Programming with Mosh
Learn Node by Wes Bos

PHP

PHP is the language that powers WordPress, so this might be a good choice if you think you will be working with small business websites, as many of them use WordPress. You can also build web apps with the Laravel framework.

Places to learn PHP:
Introduction to PHP by mmtuts
PHP for Beginners by Edwin Diaz on Udemy

Python

Python is growing in popularity, especially as it is used in data science and machine learning. It’s also considered to be good for beginners, as its syntax is simpler than some other languages. If you want to build web apps, you can use the Django or Flask frameworks.

Places to learn Python:
The Modern Python 3 Bootcamp by Colt Steele on Udemy
LearnPython.org

Ruby

Ruby is another language that has a syntax considered to be beginner-friendly as well as fun to learn. You can build web apps with the framework Ruby on Rails.

Places to learn Ruby:
The Odin Project
Ruby on Rails Tutorial by Michael Hartl

Just like with the JavaScript frameworks, there’s no #1 best programming language. Your choice should be based on either your personal interest and preference, as well as potential jobs– so do a little research on which might be a good choice for you.

Databases

Databases, as the name implies, are where you store information for your website. Most databases use a language called SQL (pronounced “sequel”) which stands for “Structured Query Language.”

In the database, data is stored in tables, with rows sort of like complex Excel documents. Then you can write queries in SQL in order to create, read, update, and delete data.

The database is run on the server, using servers like Microsoft SQL Server on Windows servers, and MySQL for Linux.

There are also NoSQL databases, which store the data in JSON files as opposed to the traditional tables. One type of NoSQL database is MongoDB, which is often used with React, Angular, and Vue applications.

Some examples of how data is utilized on websites are:

If you have a contact form on your website, you could build the form so that every time someone submits the form, their data is saved onto your database.

You can also user logins on the database, and write logic in the server-side language to handle checking and authenticating the logins.

Some resources to learn the basics of SQL are:

Some tips to leave you with…

Thanks for reading! I sincerely hope that this guide helps you get started learning web development.

A few tips that I have if you are going the self-taught route:

  1. Don’t try to learn everything at once. Pick one skill to learn at a time.
  2. Don’t jump around from tutorial to tutorial. As you’re learning, it’s ok to check out different resources to see which one you like best. But again, pick one and try to go all the way through it.
  3. Know that learning web development is a long-term journey. Despite the stories you may have read of people going from zero to landing a web dev job in 3 months, I would aim more at 1 to 2 years to become job ready, if you’re starting from the beginning.
  4. Just watching a video course or reading a book won’t automatically make you an expert. Learning the material is just the first step. Building actual websites and projects (even just demo ones for yourself) will help you to really cement your learning.

Best of luck as you start learning web development!

Want to learn how to build a website?

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Comments

B
Blackwgg
Apr 8, 2018 at 12:52 pm

Awesome

Reply
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sex
Dec 31, 2019 at 9:33 pm

Wonderful site. Lots of helpful information here. I am sending it
to some friends ans additionally sharing in delicious. And of course,
thanks to your effort!

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victor
May 2, 2018 at 3:31 am

a very nice advice to becoming a full stack web developer. Thumb up for you!

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Jessica Chan
May 2, 2018 at 8:17 am

Awesome, hope this helps you out!

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Dar...
May 2, 2018 at 5:06 am

/* clear…concise…logical…informative…thank you*/

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Jessica Chan
May 2, 2018 at 8:17 am

haha thanks for reading!

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Laurent
May 3, 2018 at 9:40 pm

Brilliant write-up I’m new to coding(just started a month ago) and I followed up until the layout part 😪..hasn’t been easy wrapping my head around that one..great review on job ducketts book also, I’m deeply in love with it.

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Jessica Chan
May 3, 2018 at 9:50 pm

Hey Laurent, glad you enjoyed the article! The Jon Duckett book is a huge favorite :) Good luck in your coding journey!

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A
Alexander
May 17, 2018 at 4:05 am

I only wish I had found this article sooner.. Great job, keep it up!

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Jessica Chan
May 17, 2018 at 8:56 am

Hey Alexander, thanks for reading!

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Sarbon
May 18, 2018 at 12:01 pm

I've been thinking and looking for beginner’s guide everywhere. I think I've found the right way where and how to start. Thanks a lot !!!!!!!!!

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Jessica Chan
May 28, 2018 at 4:13 pm

Great, I'm glad you found this guide helpful!

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Grand Code
May 22, 2018 at 12:16 am

I understand very well. that's a great article.thank you very much!

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Jessica Chan
May 28, 2018 at 4:14 pm

Glad you liked it, thanks for reading!

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Ravindra Desai
May 22, 2018 at 3:47 am

This was a great guide for beginners like me..but there is a question...you told to make free websites for a friend for practice but , how can i do that? in short how can i build free websites and practice my learnt code?
Thanks

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Jessica Chan
May 28, 2018 at 4:15 pm

Hey, thanks for reading. You can check out my other post about how to layout and design a website for information on how you can create a simple website for your portfolio.

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Abbas Akkasi
Jul 6, 2018 at 3:49 am

Thank you for the nice explanation. I only wonder if the learning process must be in parallel or sequential? (i.e. Back-End after Front-End or simultaneously)

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Jessica Chan
Jul 6, 2018 at 10:36 am

Hi Abbas, thanks for reading! Personally I would start with front-end first. Then once you have the basics of that down, you can go into back-end development. It is certainly possible to learn both at the same time, but if you're starting out I think it's better to keep it sequential.

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Shubham rajoriya
Jul 9, 2018 at 11:35 am

Very helpful....i want to make career in web designing and developing suggest me some ideas

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J
Jessica Chan
Jul 9, 2018 at 12:33 pm

It depends on where you are starting from. One place I recommend to learn for free is freeCodeCamp.org -- they are a non-profit that runs an online bootcamp!

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F
Faalen
Jul 21, 2018 at 4:59 am

Jessica, I am thankful that there are people willing to share their knowledge with us. You've put up an amazing tutorial, simple and concise but which provides a good skeleton on the infinite world of Web Development; the resources are well selected and updated...

Good luck in everything you do!

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J
Jessica Chan
Jul 21, 2018 at 12:52 pm

Hi Faalen, thanks so much for your nice note! I'm very happy that you found the guide helpful. Good luck to you in your learning!

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Hanna Frenk
Jul 24, 2018 at 5:09 am

Hi Jessica, I really appreciate your work on this article for beginners who wants to build their career in web development. You have put up a very useful article with tiny details. Thank you for sharing your knowledge.

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Jessica Chan
Jul 25, 2018 at 9:17 am

Thanks Hanna, glad that you enjoyed reading this article!

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Teerapat Prommarak
Aug 16, 2018 at 10:56 pm

This is really great article. Cheers!

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J
Jessica Chan
Sep 7, 2018 at 11:35 pm

Thank you!

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k
kyujeong lee
Aug 19, 2018 at 9:46 pm

Wow!!! perfect through covering of current Web development and trends, I have background in 4GL(PowerBuilder) programming with database. it was a long time back and have been in accounting field. I have interested in going back to programming world however it has been so hard to find material to get the feel of current programming environment and trend. This material covers so precise and trend in current programming. Will start catching up to speed to the place I would like to me.
Thanks again.

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Jessica Chan
Sep 7, 2018 at 11:35 pm

Awesome, good luck getting back into programming!

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Ravi Anand
Aug 21, 2018 at 4:51 pm

You banged right on the target! Kudos for that. Before reading this article, i was perplexed as to which frameworks, libraries to know and so on. But i feel i got my answer, and in a very helpful and concise way. Would love to read more of your articles..
Thank you.

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Jessica Chan
Sep 7, 2018 at 11:35 pm

Thank you so much for your kind words.

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Daniel Adeoye Adeodu
Aug 25, 2018 at 2:19 pm

Highly informative and educative....

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Jessica Chan
Sep 7, 2018 at 11:34 pm

Thanks!

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Blast
Aug 26, 2018 at 2:26 pm

I read a lot online, but never comment. Coming from a different CS background wanting to start a side web development project I have to say that the article was very well written, simple and elegant. Well done Jessica.

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Jessica Chan
Sep 7, 2018 at 11:34 pm

Thanks so much! I'm glad you liked it :)

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m
mohammed ismail
Sep 19, 2018 at 11:40 am

It was a great great pleasure in reading your guide for the website development. I was curious for web development and dont know where to start, really spent huge amount of time more than a month at least 4 hours a day to learn website development. Unfortunately didnt worked out. But your guide is of great help for me. Wish you good luck.

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Jessica Chan
Sep 21, 2018 at 10:57 am

Hi Mohammed, thanks so much for your comment! I'm glad you found the guide helpful. Good luck in your learning process!

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Curtly Critchlow
Oct 1, 2018 at 2:50 pm

Lovely article, Where can I find a one-stop shop to learn Vue.Js, Django and MySQL. There's bits and pieces all over the internet but I want a path that's teaching me all of the above. Thanks in advance for a favourable reply.

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Jessica Chan
Oct 1, 2018 at 2:55 pm

Thanks for reading! You can find full-stack Django courses on Udemy, which will include MySQL as well. Vue.js is a front-end JS framework that can really be bolted on to any back-end, so you will have to take a separate Vue.js course. (There isn't one single course that combined Django with Vue) Check out vuejs.org-- they have great tutorials. Hope this helps!

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Dipanshu Sabharwal
Oct 3, 2018 at 9:57 pm

If only I had found this article sooner. Great insights.

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Jessica Chan
Oct 3, 2018 at 11:27 pm

Thank you for reading! I'm glad you liked it.

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G
Gaye
Oct 31, 2018 at 2:16 am

Jessica, thank you so much for this great job. This is splendid. I had started learning to code sometime back and even programming in Java but I abandoned it later. I have l learnt a lot from this book you have written for a beginner like me.

Thank you. God will bless you in all your endeavours.

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Jessica Chan
Oct 31, 2018 at 7:17 pm

Thanks for reading! And good luck in your learning 😊

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A
Arun
Nov 4, 2018 at 8:54 am

Loved it. Thanks..😀👍👍

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Saeed Talib
Nov 7, 2018 at 3:23 am

Great work. i appreciate that and giving you rewards by daily visiting your site and commenting on it. this is little contribution to your account. Please motivate others as well.

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Jogi Vyas
Nov 12, 2018 at 9:38 pm

It has been an engaging article for newbies like myself, Jessica! I like your honesty as well as hints on encouragement. Many thanks!

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a
abed
Nov 14, 2018 at 1:31 pm

Thank you very much, I learned a lot from your article :)

Reply
a
abed
Nov 16, 2018 at 2:34 am

thank you very much, it was very helpfull article

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J
Jessica Chan
Nov 29, 2018 at 5:50 pm

Thanks for reading!

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G
Gurpreet Singh
Nov 18, 2018 at 4:57 pm

Really impressive detailed content.
I was so confused with these stuffs.
All the doubts are now very well cleared in my mind.
Thanks alot 😊

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J
Jessica Chan
Nov 29, 2018 at 5:50 pm

Awesome! Glad to hear that :)

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a
adm
Nov 20, 2018 at 6:38 am

What a great, non-tchnical summary for beginners.

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Jessica Chan
Nov 29, 2018 at 5:46 pm

Thanks for reading!

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Caro
Nov 22, 2018 at 10:18 am

Thank you so much for this amazing resource! It's exactly what I was looking for and enables me to set up a realistic plan to move forward.

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Jessica Chan
Nov 29, 2018 at 5:45 pm

You're welcome! Good luck with your learning process!

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ZOFIR AMILE
Nov 26, 2018 at 10:32 am

hit the nail on head, very informative. self studying and working on being a front-end developer.

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Jessica Chan
Nov 29, 2018 at 5:45 pm

Thanks for reading! Glad you found it helpful!

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Ashok
Dec 1, 2018 at 12:08 pm

Very nice article, thumbs up. You summarised web development world in very easy to understand language, including both back end and front end. It will help people and further reading are also going to make a difference. Thanks. Keep it up.

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Jessica Chan
Dec 12, 2018 at 12:15 pm

Glad you found this useful! Thanks for reading :)

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sabuj
Dec 7, 2018 at 8:43 am

It has been an engaging article for newbies like myself, Jessica! I like your honesty as well as hints on encouragement. Many thanks!

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Jessica Chan
Dec 12, 2018 at 12:12 pm

Awesome, thanks for reading!

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Sadiq
Dec 8, 2018 at 10:59 am

Great Article...Very useful. Thanks a ton !!!

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Jessica Chan
Dec 12, 2018 at 12:11 pm

Glad you liked it!

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Tsvetan
Dec 25, 2018 at 2:52 pm

Keep the good work up!

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Jessica Chan
Jan 9, 2019 at 12:00 pm

Thanks!

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Moses
Dec 28, 2018 at 5:01 pm

Thanks for the article... Really do enjoy it...pls i will like to know website that i can learn web development very fast am a learner.....thanks

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tabitha
Jan 13, 2019 at 11:34 am

thank you so much for creating this article and for making it freely available to us!

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Jessica Chan
Jan 29, 2019 at 1:15 pm

You're welcome! Best of luck :)

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Elisaudo
Jan 27, 2019 at 7:38 pm

Great article!! These tips will help me a lot!!! Thanks

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Jessica Chan
Jan 29, 2019 at 1:12 pm

I'm so glad to hear that!

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Sousa
Jan 27, 2019 at 7:42 pm

Thanks for the article!!!

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Jessica Chan
Jan 29, 2019 at 1:12 pm

Thank you for reading!

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Sumit
Jan 30, 2019 at 6:45 am

I cold not find any article as useful as yours. well researched, well written, well presented. you managed to answer all questions this noob had.

Thank You.

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Jessica Chan
Jan 31, 2019 at 5:07 pm

I'm so glad you found this helpful!

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Claire
Jan 31, 2019 at 7:30 am

I wanted an in-depth beginners guide - and I found it here. Brilliant writing!

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Jessica Chan
Jan 31, 2019 at 5:06 pm

I'm glad you found this helpful!

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Jei
Feb 2, 2019 at 11:25 am

It was a 2019 guide for me.
Thank you!!!

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Jessica Chan
Feb 4, 2019 at 10:12 pm

I'm so glad you found it helpful!

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Raven Blackstone
Apr 12, 2019 at 6:44 pm

Hi Jessica! I cannot thank you enough. This is an amazingly comprehensive and truly encouraging document. The links to additional resources are also extremely helpful. Your range of knowledge and your generosity in sharing it with us astounds me. Truly appreciate it. Stay well.

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Jessica Chan
Apr 24, 2019 at 2:16 pm

Thanks so much Raven!

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Shubham Rajoriya
Apr 18, 2019 at 2:29 am

Thanks for the article , Well Written, Well researched

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Fareed
May 28, 2019 at 4:19 am

Hey , Thanks for this, article was helpful,
i just want to ask that I recently start coding after Html css bootstrap , I want to seek Vue js directly , can i do that?
...'
please guide

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Jessica Chan
May 28, 2019 at 10:14 am

I would learn some basic JavaScript before starting on one of the JavaScript frameworks like Vue. Best of luck!

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Aisha sharma
May 28, 2019 at 5:01 am

Wonderful work

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Asme
May 29, 2019 at 2:52 am

Very nice and brief explanation. I love it, Thank you.😊

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Faye
May 29, 2019 at 7:48 pm

Hi Jessica, I would like you to know that this article is incredibly helpful. Thank you for taking the time out to write this so that new developers can learn how to learn:) God bless and wishing you great success in everything;)

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Nonnie
Jun 12, 2019 at 6:51 am

Hey Jesica, I have been looking for an article like this for so long and I can not tell you how much your's has helped me. I now have a roadmap on what I need to do to become a web developer.

Thank you so much and good luck with everything.

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Jessica Chan
Jun 17, 2019 at 9:07 pm

Hi Nonnie, you're very welcome! Glad that this was helpful for you :)

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Tolu
Jun 17, 2019 at 3:28 am

Thank you, your words are truly inspiring. I'm now on Angular

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Web Development London
Jun 28, 2019 at 5:47 am

Thanks for sharing this.

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adm
Jul 19, 2019 at 3:27 pm

You are the inspiring in Web Development 2019 World Wide.

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Jessica Chan
Aug 20, 2019 at 9:37 am

Thank you :)

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Jennifer
Jul 25, 2019 at 11:35 pm

I have never indulged myself in a long read as this ever since I started browsing for information on web development.... I guess I was able to give up my night sleep up to this wee hours simply because your article was very captivating, insightful and concise and your choice of words were superb.
I just understood that Webdev. is voluminous and will take long hours or years of steadfast learning to master the full stack. My question is how best can one learn? having a physical tutor? or taking online courses?

thanks for the super article and knowing that this work was put together by a SHE made it all the more thrilling.... this is the best I have ever seen... way go girl.

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Jessica Chan
Aug 20, 2019 at 9:37 am

Thanks so much for your kind words! There are many different ways to learn web development-- I recommend trying a few different methods and seeing which works best for you. Best of luck!

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Michael Bankole
Jul 29, 2019 at 5:45 am

Thanks for being so generous with your writings. You are such a precious gift.

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Jessica Chan
Aug 20, 2019 at 9:35 am

Thanks for your kind words!

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Rohitangshu
Nov 6, 2019 at 12:54 am

Great article , step by step development . Now , I m bit clear how to move ahead . thanks

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Jessica Chan
Nov 25, 2019 at 9:47 pm

I'm glad that could help you!

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Saumyabrata Bhattacharya
Nov 9, 2019 at 10:04 am

It was a great pleasure reading all the lines of your writings. It helps me a lot. Thank you so much.

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Jessica Chan
Nov 25, 2019 at 9:47 pm

I'm so glad to hear it :)

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James Kevin
Dec 12, 2019 at 8:02 am

This is a great article. Detailed and easy to follow as a beginner. I love it.

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MOCH RAHMAN
Dec 20, 2019 at 8:09 pm

Very nice article, and mostly open my mind with huge gain about what web developer is.

Thank you very much.

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ABHISHEK N
Jan 4, 2020 at 4:23 am

I found the perfect resources to start learning web development. Thank you!

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Sami Ahmed
Jan 16, 2020 at 9:06 am

m just here as a new learner. I found a lot of articles to learning skills better but i can't found. Today, Suddenly i open my search engine and again find article and m so so so happy to see this website. Thank you so so much. This website is very helpful for beginners. Thank you so much. Keep it up

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Fatima Ezzahra
Jan 17, 2020 at 6:07 am

Thank you so much for sharing this.

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J
Jhuma
Jan 29, 2020 at 2:43 am

Very informative web design tutorial article for the beginners. Keep sharing the knowledge.

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JOACHIM
Mar 26, 2020 at 9:01 pm

Thanks... Shalom...

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Werisov
Apr 1, 2020 at 5:58 am

Thanks! This is truly an adept directional guide for absolute beginners going into programming and not only Web development. As a beginner l have watched videos and read a lot of stuffs, and was unable to narrow down the overall basic requirements. Every beginner know that they need HTML, CSS & JS, but only few successfully scaled it after learning languages and tools they don't really need. Thank you for streamlining and aligning the packet managers, build tools, version control, frameworks, servers, databases and the programming languages together. Again thank you for the simplified beginner's road map. Indeed, I recommend it for absolute beginners. (Expecting your real-world responsive course.)

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